Dean Miller - Episode 20 - Dog Training

August 28, 2016

Today he continued expounding on the list on dog training success that he leaves with those he has helped train their dogs and picked up from where he had left on the need to be fair. He indicated that some have the expectation that the dog they are bringing in will come pre-packaged. Contrary to this he indicated that dogs are like a child and do not know anything unless you teach them.

If you are going to make corrections, make them simple, fair and base them on the way a dog communicates with the other. Once he concluded on this, he moved on to the fourth point.

  1. Be firm – always make your dog follow through on the command you have given before you release them. Sometimes, you may tell your dog “sit,” “move” or any other command and they may remain on the same spot without responding to the command. He called this passive dominance and indicated that a dog does not need to do anything to win.In such a case, you do not have to be mean or do anything harsh but you need to stand your ground and be firm like a parent. If you have given a command like “sit” to your dog and they fail to respond the first, second or even third time, he indicates that one of the options would be to lead them gently into a sitting position physically and appreciate them for responding to this.In essence, this is supposed to suggest that when he says it, he means it, he will enforce it and the dog should do it. This is the pattern of an alpha dog and dogs want to follow one who has a sense of authority.
  2. Be consistent – do not vary your commands during the initial training. This happens a lot when a dog is a puppy. The commands we use should be in single words that are simple because using many different words at the same time, is undermining your training. Once you use one word, leave some silence and if the dog fails to respond even after repeating the same command, move to where they are, bring them to where you are calling them and reward them for this as well.
  3. Be patient – expect to be repetitive until the dog grasps what you are conveying. Dogs learn by repetition and demonstration and there is no immediate in dog training that is why we need to work with repetition.
  4. Be visual – demonstrate exactly what you are expecting and guide the dog in a way they can follow. Using visual cues helps them have something else to enforce what you are saying. Adding treats to this may be important but phase them out quickly so the dog can begin to do things because you said so not because you are bribing them with a treat.
  5. Be generous with praise – praise goes a long way and dogs also love to know that they have done a good job. The sooner the dog responds to your command the more praise they should receive. On this point, he indicated that he is a firm believer in gentle, calm, quiet praise since he is always trying to create a calm dog in his home.The reason is because high pitched praises get a dog excited and there is nothing wrong with this but it is basically not the case with gentle praise.
  6. Keep your expectations in check – raise the bar slowly, it takes some dogs longer than others to learn particular commands. Be patient. Sooner or later, if you follow the rules, your pet will catch on. You should never have the same expectations for all dogs and it is good to appreciate this.
  7. Always end every training session on a positive note with lots of praise and/rewards – rewards do not always have to be food treats. A short ride is like Christmas to many dogs. New favorite toys, a quick aim of fetch among others, are great reward options too.

Bottom line, keep training sessions short and fun and before you know it, you will be the proud owner of a good dog.

00:0000:00

Dean Miller - Episode 20 - Dog Training

August 28, 2016

Today he continued expounding on the list on dog training success that he leaves with those he has helped train their dogs and picked up from where he had left on the need to be fair. He indicated that some have the expectation that the dog they are bringing in will come pre-packaged. Contrary to this he indicated that dogs are like a child and do not know anything unless you teach them.

If you are going to make corrections, make them simple, fair and base them on the way a dog communicates with the other. Once he concluded on this, he moved on to the fourth point.

  1. Be firm – always make your dog follow through on the command you have given before you release them. Sometimes, you may tell your dog “sit,” “move” or any other command and they may remain on the same spot without responding to the command. He called this passive dominance and indicated that a dog does not need to do anything to win.In such a case, you do not have to be mean or do anything harsh but you need to stand your ground and be firm like a parent. If you have given a command like “sit” to your dog and they fail to respond the first, second or even third time, he indicates that one of the options would be to lead them gently into a sitting position physically and appreciate them for responding to this.In essence, this is supposed to suggest that when he says it, he means it, he will enforce it and the dog should do it. This is the pattern of an alpha dog and dogs want to follow one who has a sense of authority.
  2. Be consistent – do not vary your commands during the initial training. This happens a lot when a dog is a puppy. The commands we use should be in single words that are simple because using many different words at the same time, is undermining your training. Once you use one word, leave some silence and if the dog fails to respond even after repeating the same command, move to where they are, bring them to where you are calling them and reward them for this as well.
  3. Be patient – expect to be repetitive until the dog grasps what you are conveying. Dogs learn by repetition and demonstration and there is no immediate in dog training that is why we need to work with repetition.
  4. Be visual – demonstrate exactly what you are expecting and guide the dog in a way they can follow. Using visual cues helps them have something else to enforce what you are saying. Adding treats to this may be important but phase them out quickly so the dog can begin to do things because you said so not because you are bribing them with a treat.
  5. Be generous with praise – praise goes a long way and dogs also love to know that they have done a good job. The sooner the dog responds to your command the more praise they should receive. On this point, he indicated that he is a firm believer in gentle, calm, quiet praise since he is always trying to create a calm dog in his home.The reason is because high pitched praises get a dog excited and there is nothing wrong with this but it is basically not the case with gentle praise.
  6. Keep your expectations in check – raise the bar slowly, it takes some dogs longer than others to learn particular commands. Be patient. Sooner or later, if you follow the rules, your pet will catch on. You should never have the same expectations for all dogs and it is good to appreciate this.
  7. Always end every training session on a positive note with lots of praise and/rewards – rewards do not always have to be food treats. A short ride is like Christmas to many dogs. New favorite toys, a quick aim of fetch among others, are great reward options too.

Bottom line, keep training sessions short and fun and before you know it, you will be the proud owner of a good dog.

Watch Now:

Dean Miller - Episode 19 - Dog Training

August 25, 2016
He started by saying that when training a dog, he would spend less time training them if he did not need to spend time explaining to the owner of the dog how to go about this. The reason is because a good relationship and listening skills work well when training a dog in light of the fact that he bases his training on the way dogs communicate.

He suggested that what helps dogs understand you is learning a few words in their language. Today, he went through part of the sheets he leaves with every dog owner he has helped train their dog. He was handling the portion on “10 Rules for Dog Training Success” from these sheets.

He emphasized that well mannered dogs do not just happen. On the contrary, this is a matter of training them. He also suggested that it is never too soon to begin good habits, repetition and gentle training for a dog and at this point, one should have infant expectations with their dog. He indicated that humans should always be the boss, alpha and the leader of the household. That is because a dog views life as a park order and this is all done with attitude and not hitting the dog or anything of that sort.

He indicated that a dog thrives on structure, order and leadership and from the list he explained that successful dog training is pegged on

  1. Setting your dog up to succeed – owners expect too much too fast but if you set your dog up to succeed; your dog will want to do more. Celebrate the small progress that your dog shows
  2. Keeping it simple – use one word commands where possible. It is easier for your dog to comprehend one word rather than a paragraph. On this point, he also indicated that he believes commands should be backed by authority and there should be no negotiation about it.
  3. Silence is powerful and it is important to wait in silence after giving a dog a certain command to see the response.
  4. Being fair – do not expect your dog to read your mind. Make sure they understand what you expect from them.
00:0000:00

Dean Miller - Episode 19 - Dog Training

August 25, 2016
He started by saying that when training a dog, he would spend less time training them if he did not need to spend time explaining to the owner of the dog how to go about this. The reason is because a good relationship and listening skills work well when training a dog in light of the fact that he bases his training on the way dogs communicate.

He suggested that what helps dogs understand you is learning a few words in their language. Today, he went through part of the sheets he leaves with every dog owner he has helped train their dog. He was handling the portion on “10 Rules for Dog Training Success” from these sheets.

He emphasized that well mannered dogs do not just happen. On the contrary, this is a matter of training them. He also suggested that it is never too soon to begin good habits, repetition and gentle training for a dog and at this point, one should have infant expectations with their dog. He indicated that humans should always be the boss, alpha and the leader of the household. That is because a dog views life as a park order and this is all done with attitude and not hitting the dog or anything of that sort.

He indicated that a dog thrives on structure, order and leadership and from the list he explained that successful dog training is pegged on

  1. Setting your dog up to succeed – owners expect too much too fast but if you set your dog up to succeed; your dog will want to do more. Celebrate the small progress that your dog shows
  2. Keeping it simple – use one word commands where possible. It is easier for your dog to comprehend one word rather than a paragraph. On this point, he also indicated that he believes commands should be backed by authority and there should be no negotiation about it.
  3. Silence is powerful and it is important to wait in silence after giving a dog a certain command to see the response.
  4. Being fair – do not expect your dog to read your mind. Make sure they understand what you expect from them.
Watch Now:

Dean Miller - Episode 18 - Dog Training

August 21, 2016
As he started, there was a question on why dogs fear fireworks and in response he said dogs hear about 3 ½ or 4 times more than we humans. They hear much more intensely and since they do not see where this is coming from, they are terrified since it is an out of control situation.

Today, he handled one of the most common questions he has encountered in his training session. People have often asked whether it is okay to sleep with dogs in their beds. In some cultures, this is really weird. He confirmed that his dogs sleep on his bed and that he believes this is a personal choice. When it comes to sleeping on the bed, it depends on the dog, the family and the individual.

Some dogs are more territorial than others; others have a more hardcore attitude about what is theirs and what is not while some will leap on a bed and claim that space. Even with this, he insisted that it is a good thing to train a dog at the puppy stage that the bed belongs to you and that they are only there because you invited them.

When a dog rushes ahead of you and claims the best spot on your bed, this can often lead to leadership issues and it is a nice ritual to ask the dog to sit and wait before calling them up to your bed. He advised on making use of pet stairs that one can place beside the bed if they have a small dog or one that is prone to injury.

Most people tend to humanize this issue in an attempt to keep it equal because they empathize with their dog but on the contrary, dogs do not think like that. They are creatures of hierarchy that focus on who is above, who is below, who is dominant and the like. He indicated that if the dog growls or grouches at you, they should get off the bed immediately because this behavior can escalate to bigger problems in future.

They can come up the bed later on and this will help them learn. He got a question asking how to prevent a dog from eating stuff when one is not at home. To answer this, he said that this begins with teaching such a dog how you feel about those objects when you are at home. One of the mistakes that people make in this case, is when they find such a dog chewing on stuff, they grab the stuff and put it away.

Interestingly, this inadvertently creates an exciting moment turning it into a game. What you should do is be as still as possible, walk over to the dog and when the dog has its mouth on your stuff, say “no” as you give them an abrupt touch. After this is done, stand there until the dog releases whatever it was chewing on. When it is finally released say “good dog” and place the same object right in front of the dog once again.

As the dog approaches it again, touch it again as you say “no” before the dog gets to it. Soon the dog begins to respect this and when they relax or lose interest in that object that is when you should put it away. He also indicated that there is a tendency of moving too fast in allowing one’s dog to have freedom around the house but this should be done gradually and in stages for them to learn. A dog can also chew on stuff due to separation anxiety and this is best corrected at level one before it gets overboard.
00:0000:00

Dean Miller - Episode 18 - Dog Training

August 21, 2016
As he started, there was a question on why dogs fear fireworks and in response he said dogs hear about 3 ½ or 4 times more than we humans. They hear much more intensely and since they do not see where this is coming from, they are terrified since it is an out of control situation.

Today, he handled one of the most common questions he has encountered in his training session. People have often asked whether it is okay to sleep with dogs in their beds. In some cultures, this is really weird. He confirmed that his dogs sleep on his bed and that he believes this is a personal choice. When it comes to sleeping on the bed, it depends on the dog, the family and the individual.

Some dogs are more territorial than others; others have a more hardcore attitude about what is theirs and what is not while some will leap on a bed and claim that space. Even with this, he insisted that it is a good thing to train a dog at the puppy stage that the bed belongs to you and that they are only there because you invited them.

When a dog rushes ahead of you and claims the best spot on your bed, this can often lead to leadership issues and it is a nice ritual to ask the dog to sit and wait before calling them up to your bed. He advised on making use of pet stairs that one can place beside the bed if they have a small dog or one that is prone to injury.

Most people tend to humanize this issue in an attempt to keep it equal because they empathize with their dog but on the contrary, dogs do not think like that. They are creatures of hierarchy that focus on who is above, who is below, who is dominant and the like. He indicated that if the dog growls or grouches at you, they should get off the bed immediately because this behavior can escalate to bigger problems in future.

They can come up the bed later on and this will help them learn. He got a question asking how to prevent a dog from eating stuff when one is not at home. To answer this, he said that this begins with teaching such a dog how you feel about those objects when you are at home. One of the mistakes that people make in this case, is when they find such a dog chewing on stuff, they grab the stuff and put it away.

Interestingly, this inadvertently creates an exciting moment turning it into a game. What you should do is be as still as possible, walk over to the dog and when the dog has its mouth on your stuff, say “no” as you give them an abrupt touch. After this is done, stand there until the dog releases whatever it was chewing on. When it is finally released say “good dog” and place the same object right in front of the dog once again.

As the dog approaches it again, touch it again as you say “no” before the dog gets to it. Soon the dog begins to respect this and when they relax or lose interest in that object that is when you should put it away. He also indicated that there is a tendency of moving too fast in allowing one’s dog to have freedom around the house but this should be done gradually and in stages for them to learn. A dog can also chew on stuff due to separation anxiety and this is best corrected at level one before it gets overboard.
Watch Now:

Dean Miller - Episode 17 - Dog Training

August 18, 2016
Today he reviewed some of the previous sessions he had done that he deemed important. He started by reviewing a story about a Siberian husky he had worked with and indicated that this is a high energy breed that shows signs of the need to be engaged from an early age. The husky he worked with was 5 months old by the name Misty and was a smart dog in that after practicing on something with her several times, she would get it.

He indicated that he bases his training on the way dogs communicate with each other and that he is also a get to the point kind of trainer. Just as is the case of going to class, he teaches behaviors and helps you train your dog when he pays you a visit at home not only the general aspects of training but also those things you want your dog to do.

Going back to the husky story, he indicated that where Misty lived, there were two teenagers and their parents in addition to two other smaller dogs. The chiwawa in the house happened to be the dominant one. Misty was meant for the son in the house, the chiwawa for their daughter while the third was considered more of a family dog.

He noted that as would be expected, there is a tendency to incline on one dog in such a setting but a balance of all dogs in the park is very important. This is due to the fact that dogs want to know the leader in terms of where to start in the order of things. In this particular home, there was no real structure and the dogs would fight each other over some things.

The little chiwawa was leader of the park here and he suggests that this is not attached to the size of the dog but rather what a dog believes. He noted that dogs exhibit traits of an alpha dog or mid level dog right from the puppy stage and they do not live in pretense; they are just who they are and what you see is what you get.

When dealing with an alpha dog, you need not take away their self esteem but let them know you are a notch higher above them. The chiwawa would get on top of the seat to dominate the environment or would lie on ones lap to capture their attention. As such, when you push an alpha dog when training them, they will push back and in such a case, you need to stand your ground and win the moment without fighting or hurting the dog.

Humans tend to use a lot of words, try to reason with dogs, can hardly understand why dogs do not seem to get it and that is because they do not put it to them in simple enough terms. When you have a puppy in the house, you need to respect the older dogs because they will make it easier for you to raise your puppies.

He noted that you need a relationship with your dogs whereby you fulfill their needs and they fulfill yours too while avoiding any selfish motive. He indicates that “come” is the most important command you can teach your dogs and when they respond, you can give them treats and appreciate them as well after which you allow them to continue with what they were engaged in.
00:0000:00

Dean Miller - Episode 17 - Dog Training

August 18, 2016
Today he reviewed some of the previous sessions he had done that he deemed important. He started by reviewing a story about a Siberian husky he had worked with and indicated that this is a high energy breed that shows signs of the need to be engaged from an early age. The husky he worked with was 5 months old by the name Misty and was a smart dog in that after practicing on something with her several times, she would get it.

He indicated that he bases his training on the way dogs communicate with each other and that he is also a get to the point kind of trainer. Just as is the case of going to class, he teaches behaviors and helps you train your dog when he pays you a visit at home not only the general aspects of training but also those things you want your dog to do.

Going back to the husky story, he indicated that where Misty lived, there were two teenagers and their parents in addition to two other smaller dogs. The chiwawa in the house happened to be the dominant one. Misty was meant for the son in the house, the chiwawa for their daughter while the third was considered more of a family dog.

He noted that as would be expected, there is a tendency to incline on one dog in such a setting but a balance of all dogs in the park is very important. This is due to the fact that dogs want to know the leader in terms of where to start in the order of things. In this particular home, there was no real structure and the dogs would fight each other over some things.

The little chiwawa was leader of the park here and he suggests that this is not attached to the size of the dog but rather what a dog believes. He noted that dogs exhibit traits of an alpha dog or mid level dog right from the puppy stage and they do not live in pretense; they are just who they are and what you see is what you get.

When dealing with an alpha dog, you need not take away their self esteem but let them know you are a notch higher above them. The chiwawa would get on top of the seat to dominate the environment or would lie on ones lap to capture their attention. As such, when you push an alpha dog when training them, they will push back and in such a case, you need to stand your ground and win the moment without fighting or hurting the dog.

Humans tend to use a lot of words, try to reason with dogs, can hardly understand why dogs do not seem to get it and that is because they do not put it to them in simple enough terms. When you have a puppy in the house, you need to respect the older dogs because they will make it easier for you to raise your puppies.

He noted that you need a relationship with your dogs whereby you fulfill their needs and they fulfill yours too while avoiding any selfish motive. He indicates that “come” is the most important command you can teach your dogs and when they respond, you can give them treats and appreciate them as well after which you allow them to continue with what they were engaged in.
Watch Now:

Dean Miller - Episode 16 - Dog Training

August 14, 2016
Today he was talking about dog park etiquette since he believes that many people are not concerned with the way they behave at the dog park. Most people think that the dog park is a free for all and that it’s a place for dogs to exercise, run around and have their time. This may be true but there are rules, boundaries and limitations here, to what dogs can do. This is what he believes in and he urged the audience to look at a dog park through the eyes of their dogs.

He pointed out that for some people, going to a dog park appears to be fun but to the dog this might be a prison experience in their view because it is a contained area with a bunch of other dogs around. Therefore, for some dogs, it’s not a fun experience but rather a terrifying moment, for some it is a bullying moment, some are prone to submission, some may fight while others are just playful and end up having fun.

Dogs need socialization and a dog park can be a great place for this but you need to approach it carefully and steadily. When taking your dog to the dog park for the first time, he suggested that you need to watch their behavior in the car; is the dog terrified, excited, agitated, aggressive and the like, since these are indicators of what you will get at the dog park once your dog exits the car.

He indicated that you need to take note of these initial signs that may be questionable and act accordingly before the situation escalates. One of the strategies he uses when he visits the dog park is to walk his dog on a leash outside the park, close to the fence while checking how they behave.

Once he is confident that his dog is composed, he enters the park and gets the dog off leash. He insisted that this is general advice and seeking additional insight on this depending on your dog, will be a wise idea. On the other hand, having your dog on a leash inside the park when they are surrounded by other dogs creates a notion of being held back in them, when they should fight or take to flight.

This can trigger a fight and getting them off leash is better since they are free to choose how to react. When you allow your dog to socialize normally with dogs of their similar energy and intensity, their skills and interactions begin to develop. Dog parks are great but you need to be careful how you bring your dog in and how you get them out.

Sometimes it’s better to go to the park off hours if you feel that you are not that experienced, for your dog to learn how to socialize with other dogs gradually. He pointed out that neutering is the other aspect that many do not consider and if your dog is not neutered and you bring them to the park, they bring with them a foreign smell.

This scent is known to other dogs and if other dogs are neutered, the scent of your dog that is not neutered may give rise to a fight amongst the dogs in the park and this is something worth considering as well.
00:0000:00

Dean Miller- Episode 16 - Dog Training

August 14, 2016
Today he was talking about dog park etiquette since he believes that many people are not concerned with the way they behave at the dog park. Most people think that the dog park is a free for all and that it’s a place for dogs to exercise, run around and have their time. This may be true but there are rules, boundaries and limitations here, to what dogs can do. This is what he believes in and he urged the audience to look at a dog park through the eyes of their dogs.

He pointed out that for some people, going to a dog park appears to be fun but to the dog this might be a prison experience in their view because it is a contained area with a bunch of other dogs around. Therefore, for some dogs, it’s not a fun experience but rather a terrifying moment, for some it is a bullying moment, some are prone to submission, some may fight while others are just playful and end up having fun.

Dogs need socialization and a dog park can be a great place for this but you need to approach it carefully and steadily. When taking your dog to the dog park for the first time, he suggested that you need to watch their behavior in the car; is the dog terrified, excited, agitated, aggressive and the like, since these are indicators of what you will get at the dog park once your dog exits the car.

He indicated that you need to take note of these initial signs that may be questionable and act accordingly before the situation escalates. One of the strategies he uses when he visits the dog park is to walk his dog on a leash outside the park, close to the fence while checking how they behave.

Once he is confident that his dog is composed, he enters the park and gets the dog off leash. He insisted that this is general advice and seeking additional insight on this depending on your dog, will be a wise idea. On the other hand, having your dog on a leash inside the park when they are surrounded by other dogs creates a notion of being held back in them, when they should fight or take to flight.

This can trigger a fight and getting them off leash is better since they are free to choose how to react. When you allow your dog to socialize normally with dogs of their similar energy and intensity, their skills and interactions begin to develop. Dog parks are great but you need to be careful how you bring your dog in and how you get them out.

Sometimes it’s better to go to the park off hours if you feel that you are not that experienced, for your dog to learn how to socialize with other dogs gradually. He pointed out that neutering is the other aspect that many do not consider and if your dog is not neutered and you bring them to the park, they bring with them a foreign smell.

This scent is known to other dogs and if other dogs are neutered, the scent of your dog that is not neutered may give rise to a fight amongst the dogs in the park and this is something worth considering as well.
Watch Now: